Assembly Bill 18 (Brownley)

Assembly Bill 18 (Brownley)

School-based Financial Reporting System

Introduced December 6, 2010
WHAT DOES IT DO?
Requires the state Superintendent of Public Instruction to make recommendations to the Legislature and Governor for changes to support development, implementation and use of comprehensive school-level financial data to show:

  • How funding is spent and the source of funding at the school level in a simple, transparent way (“transparency”)
  • Analyses of school-level financial data such as fund source, function, program and objective
  • Comparisons of financial data across schools within and outside of the district, and over time
  • How funds spent at school sites links to increasing student achievement for program and policy evaluation (“accountability”)
  • Public can see information about all aspects of school performance

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
California schools are funded with taxpayer dollars.  The public has a right to know how public funds are spent and that they are spent fairly (equally) and most efficiently and effectively (equitably).  A quality education is a fundamental right owed to every child under the California Constitution.  AB 18 will help California adequately and equitably fund its public schools.

California’s current education finance system is too complex to understand.  It is almost impossible to determine how much revenue each school district receives or how those revenues are spent.  Local communities, parents, students and state policymakers need to be able to follow the money to make informed decisions.
There are substantial differences in spending between school and districts.  Spending is not related to actual needs of students or needs of teachers and principals to support students to be prepared for college and careers and civic participation.
AB 18 includes a reference to the funding lawsuits, including Campaign for Quality Education (CQE) v. State, which seeks a declaration from the court that the current school finance system is unconstitutional and an order from the Court to the Legislature to fix it.  (Unlike the Robles-Wong suit), the CQE suit seeks foundational reforms to ensure that school funding is effectively spent.  Specifically, our suit seeks:

  • An adequate data system to ensure dollars are spent on programs and policies that provide the greatest access to a meaningful education
  • An adequate system for ensuring the most important element in student learning—well-prepared, effective teachers—are available to all students, particularly those in the neediest schools and
  • Preschool for all low-income students.

The CQE filed our own lawsuit because it allows grassroots community members—primarily

low-income parents and students—an independent voice so that they will have a direct say in their children’s future.  To read the entire press release or learn more about the historic CQE et al v.

California lawsuit, go to www.fairschoolsnow.org

——-

Assembly Bill 18 (Brownley)

School-based Financial Reporting System

Introduced December 6, 2010
WHAT DOES IT DO?
Requires the state Superintendent of Public Instruction to make recommendations to the Legislature and Governor for changes to support development, implementation and use of comprehensive school-level financial data to show:

  • How funding is spent and the source of funding at the school level in a simple, transparent way (“transparency”)
  • Analyses of school-level financial data such as fund source, function, program and objective
  • Comparisons of financial data across schools within and outside of the district, and over time
  • How funds spent at school sites links to increasing student achievement for program and policy evaluation (“accountability”)
  • Public can see information about all aspects of school performance

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
California schools are funded with taxpayer dollars.  The public has a right to know how public funds are spent and that they are spent fairly (equally) and most efficiently and effectively (equitably).  A quality education is a fundamental right owed to every child under the California Constitution.  AB 18 will help California adequately and equitably fund its public schools.

California’s current education finance system is too complex to understand.  It is almost impossible to determine how much revenue each school district receives or how those revenues are spent.  Local communities, parents, students and state policymakers need to be able to follow the money to make informed decisions.
There are substantial differences in spending between school and districts.  Spending is not related to actual needs of students or needs of teachers and principals to support students to be prepared for college and careers and civic participation.
AB 18 includes a reference to the funding lawsuits, including Campaign for Quality Education (CQE) v. State, which seeks a declaration from the court that the current school finance system is unconstitutional and an order from the Court to the Legislature to fix it.  (Unlike the Robles-Wong suit), the CQE suit seeks foundational reforms to ensure that school funding is effectively spent.  Specifically, our suit seeks:

  • An adequate data system to ensure dollars are spent on programs and policies that provide the greatest access to a meaningful education
  • An adequate system for ensuring the most important element in student learning—well-prepared, effective teachers—are available to all students, particularly those in the neediest schools and
  • Preschool for all low-income students.

The CQE filed our own lawsuit because it allows grassroots community members—primarily

low-income parents and students—an independent voice so that they will have a direct say in their children’s future.  To read the entire press release or learn more about the historic CQE et al v.

California lawsuit, go to www.fairschoolsnow.org

——–

Assembly Bill 18 (Brownley)

School-based Financial Reporting System

Introduced December 6, 2010
WHAT DOES IT DO?
Requires the state Superintendent of Public Instruction to make recommendations to the Legislature and Governor for changes to support development, implementation and use of comprehensive school-level financial data to show:

  • How funding is spent and the source of funding at the school level in a simple, transparent way (“transparency”)
  • Analyses of school-level financial data such as fund source, function, program and objective
  • Comparisons of financial data across schools within and outside of the district, and over time
  • How funds spent at school sites links to increasing student achievement for program and policy evaluation (“accountability”)
  • Public can see information about all aspects of school performance

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
California schools are funded with taxpayer dollars.  The public has a right to know how public funds are spent and that they are spent fairly (equally) and most efficiently and effectively (equitably).  A quality education is a fundamental right owed to every child under the California Constitution.  AB 18 will help California adequately and equitably fund its public schools.

California’s current education finance system is too complex to understand.  It is almost impossible to determine how much revenue each school district receives or how those revenues are spent.  Local communities, parents, students and state policymakers need to be able to follow the money to make informed decisions.
There are substantial differences in spending between school and districts.  Spending is not related to actual needs of students or needs of teachers and principals to support students to be prepared for college and careers and civic participation.
AB 18 includes a reference to the funding lawsuits, including Campaign for Quality Education (CQE) v. State, which seeks a declaration from the court that the current school finance system is unconstitutional and an order from the Court to the Legislature to fix it.  (Unlike the Robles-Wong suit), the CQE suit seeks foundational reforms to ensure that school funding is effectively spent.  Specifically, our suit seeks:

  • An adequate data system to ensure dollars are spent on programs and policies that provide the greatest access to a meaningful education
  • An adequate system for ensuring the most important element in student learning—well-prepared, effective teachers—are available to all students, particularly those in the neediest schools and
  • Preschool for all low-income students.

The CQE filed our own lawsuit because it allows grassroots community members—primarily

low-income parents and students—an independent voice so that they will have a direct say in their children’s future.  To read the entire press release or learn more about the historic CQE et al v.

California lawsuit, go to www.fairschoolsnow.org

 

 

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